Macramé / Other

Free Macramé Pattern: DIY Macramé Wall Hanging

Today, I’m so excited to be sharing this free diy macramé wall hanging pattern! Macramé is actually one of the first crafts I picked up, and it remains one of my favorite hobbies.

Although you can really use any type of material for your macramé wall hanging, the perennial mainstay is natural-colored cotton rope. For home décor, this tends to blend seamlessly into any style, and will always look timeless. You go through rope quickly with macramé (and it can be very addicting!), so I would suggest buying your cotton rope in bulk if you intend to make even a few small projects.

For this macramé wall hanging, you’ll need about 130 feet of rope, and with any macramé design, it’s good to err on the side of ‘too much’ rather than ‘too little.’ And hang on to the scraps of rope that you end up with at the end of the project! These are perfect to use to make tassels, keychains, or any other small macramé projects.


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Materials & Tools:

About 130 feet (39.6 m) of 2-mm cotton single-twist string (Edit: a previous version of this post called for 3-mm string; after reviewing the pattern again and some more experimentation, we have updated this information. Sorry for any confusion this may have caused.)

1 stick or dowel, 10-12 inches long



Knots Used:

Lark’s Head Knot (LHK)

  1. Fold rope in half, then fold the loop over the dowel.
  2. Pull the ends of the rope through the loop and tighten the knot.

Diagonal Double Half Hitch (DDHH)

free macrame pattern, lark's head knot tutorial
  1. Hold filler cord diagonally over other cords.
  2. Take working cord and pull it over filler cord, then to the left to make a loop around the filler cord. Tighten to make 1 half hitch.
  3. Repeat Step 2 to make a double half hitch.
  4. Tighten.

Square Knot (SK)

free macrame pattern, square knot tutorial 1
free macrame pattern, square knot tutorial 2
  1. Bring working cord 1 over fillers cords 2 & 3, then under working cord 4 .
  2. Bring working cord 4 under filler cords 2 & 3, then over working cord 1 .
  3. Bring working cord 4 under filler cords 2 & 3, then over working cord 1 .
  4. Bring working cord 1 over filler cords, then under working cord 4. Tighten knot.

Pattern:

  1. Cut 20 pieces of rope, each 78″ (198 cm) long. Attach the ropes using a lark’s head knot to the stick or dowel. [The ropes, once attached to the dowel, are now divided into cords. Since each rope was folded in half, there are 40 cords we’ll be working with].
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
20 ropes, folded and attached, are now called cords. We’ll be working with these 40 cords.
  1. Divide the 40 cords into 5 sections, with 8 cords in each section. In each of these sections, create a closed diamond pattern, using two sets of Diagonal Double Half Hitches.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
Try to keep your pattern consistent. At the bottom of each diamond, you’ll be left with just the two filler cords. In this piece, I made the remaining right filler cord of each diamond the working cord, tying a double half hitch around the left filler cord.
  1. Tie a Square Knot between each set of Diagonal Double Half Hitches, each with four filler cords. Make sure these filler cords stay flat and that they don’t overlap each other.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
Tie Square Knots like this only under the complete open points. You should finish this row with a total of 4 Square Knots.
  1. Close each diamond around the Square Knot with another set of Diagonal Double Half Hitches.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
  1. Repeat Steps 3-4 three times, until you have four rows of completed diamonds.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
  1. For the next 4 rows, repeat the same pattern, but decrease the number of diamonds each time, until there’s only one diamond in the final row.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
Four complete diamonds in row 5.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
Three complete diamonds in row 6.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
Two complete diamonds in row 7. Finish with one complete diamond in row 8.
  1. To create the fringe, trim the cords at an angle, keeping fringe longer in the center and shorter to the sides.
  2. Using a comb or fork, unravel the cords to create a softer, more feathery fringe.
free macrame pattern, instructional photo
Unraveling/combing the cords is what gives the full texture in the right side image.

Once the fringe is fluffed, your macramé wall hanging is complete. Add another piece of rope or some twine to hang it, and add any desired embellishments.

free macrame pattern, instructional photo, fall decor

Because of the season, I used a longer stick for the hanging so that I could add the floral picks seen in the completed images. Don’t attach these too tightly, as you don’t want to fray or tear the pattern if you choose to swap out the embellishments between seasons.


14 Comments

  • Polly
    15/12/2020 at 9:03 PM

    The length for these cords don’t work, if you follow this exactly you won’t have long fringe at the end. Thought this was a really cute design and followed the instructions exactly and was left with with strings barely an inch left for half of the “fringe”. Looks completely uneven done. Would double the length of each cord going forward unless you want to spend an hour making a piece that looks terrible in the end.

    Reply
    • Admin
      16/12/2020 at 9:19 AM

      Hi Polly!

      Thanks for giving this pattern a try, and we appreciate the feedback! I’m sorry that it didn’t turn out looking so hot 🙁 Can I ask what size cord you used for your piece? Using anything larger than the recommended for this pattern could skew the measurements, and would require longer cuts to get that extra fringe.

      Reply
  • Polly
    15/12/2020 at 9:03 PM

    The length for these cords don’t work, if you follow this exactly you won’t have long fringe at the end. Thought this was a really cute design and followed the instructions exactly and was left with with strings barely an inch left for half of the “fringe”. Looks completely uneven done. Would double the length of each cord going forward unless you want to spend an hour making a piece that looks terrible in the end.

    Reply
    • Admin
      16/12/2020 at 9:19 AM

      Hi Polly!

      Thanks for giving this pattern a try, and we appreciate the feedback! I’m sorry that it didn’t turn out looking so hot 🙁 Can I ask what size cord you used for your piece? Using anything larger than the recommended for this pattern could skew the measurements, and would require longer cuts to get that extra fringe.

      Reply
  • Jen
    30/12/2020 at 10:39 PM

    This is so cute!! I just completed it by following your pattern and the above comment is right. I would definitely double the length of my cord to get the longer fringe. I cut mine 100″ and it was still too short for what I was hoping for. I have about 6″ of fringe right now. I used 4 mm 3 strand twisted cord. Could it have something to do with tension at all? I’m new to macrame, so learning as I go. Thanks so much for the tutorial! 🙂

    Reply
    • Admin
      05/01/2021 at 10:00 AM

      I’m so glad you liked it, Jen! Thanks for the feedback, it’s so helpful hearing what worked for you! Tension will definitely affect the length of the piece, since how tightly or loosely the knots are tied will affect how much rope is used for each knot, same as how varying the size/thickness of the rope will affect how much is needed for a piece.

      Reply
  • Jen
    30/12/2020 at 10:39 PM

    This is so cute!! I just completed it by following your pattern and the above comment is right. I would definitely double the length of my cord to get the longer fringe. I cut mine 100″ and it was still too short for what I was hoping for. I have about 6″ of fringe right now. I used 4 mm 3 strand twisted cord. Could it have something to do with tension at all? I’m new to macrame, so learning as I go. Thanks so much for the tutorial! 🙂

    Reply
    • Admin
      05/01/2021 at 10:00 AM

      I’m so glad you liked it, Jen! Thanks for the feedback, it’s so helpful hearing what worked for you! Tension will definitely affect the length of the piece, since how tightly or loosely the knots are tied will affect how much rope is used for each knot, same as how varying the size/thickness of the rope will affect how much is needed for a piece.

      Reply
  • Kathy D
    12/01/2021 at 12:19 PM

    Hi,
    I am wondering what the completed length of this wall hanging is with and without the fringe?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Admin
      12/01/2021 at 4:43 PM

      Hi Kathy!

      The completed piece you see in the photos measures 7.5 inches from the top of the piece to the longest point (without fringe), and 14 inches from the top to the longest point of the fringe.

      Reply
  • Kathy D
    12/01/2021 at 12:19 PM

    Hi,
    I am wondering what the completed length of this wall hanging is with and without the fringe?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Admin
      12/01/2021 at 4:43 PM

      Hi Kathy!

      The completed piece you see in the photos measures 7.5 inches from the top of the piece to the longest point (without fringe), and 14 inches from the top to the longest point of the fringe.

      Reply
  • Kathy D
    12/01/2021 at 4:53 PM

    Thank you very much. If I order the 1st rope that is single strand in 2mm in 2.5 # cone will my cords be long enough for the fringe as directions are written? It has been many years since I have done macrame. I am so excited to start again.

    Reply
  • Kathy D
    12/01/2021 at 4:53 PM

    Thank you very much. If I order the 1st rope that is single strand in 2mm in 2.5 # cone will my cords be long enough for the fringe as directions are written? It has been many years since I have done macrame. I am so excited to start again.

    Reply

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